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Showing posts from February, 2018

Lent 1B

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Readings can be found here
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In the Beginning it is Always Dark
During my Ash Wednesday sermon this past week, I connected the closing words of one of my favorite Mary Oliver poems, The Summer Day, with the words of the prophet Isaiah. “What will you do with your one wild and precious life?” the poet inquires, while the prophet gives word to God’s depiction of us as the “repairers of the breach, restorer of streets to live on”.
For me, in juxtaposing these two texts, I wanted us to begin our Lenten observance by framing our lives as a gift that is to be used for a purpose—God’s purpose. God’s purpose of liberation. God’s purpose of reconciliation. God’s purpose of restoration. And, in God’s purpose we become the means to an end—an end that is a new beginning.
Lent stands as a reminder that as Christians we are called to share in God’s purpose and work towards the vision of wholeness established at creation.
And, that is what I said, before I knew.
Before I knew that our country had once …

Ash Wednesday, 2018

Preached before I knew that a teenager had just murdered 17 (teens and adults) in Parkland, Florida For readings, here
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Ash Wednesday 2018
This year’s Lenten booklet weaves together the poetry of Mary Oliver with scriptural passages and practices. In light of this, I want to offer you one of my favorite Mary Oliver poems, The Summer Day
Who made the world? Who made the swan, and the black bear? Who made the grasshopper? This grasshopper, I mean- the one who has flung herself out of the grass, the one who is eating sugar out of my hand, who is moving her jaws back and forth instead of up and down- who is gazing around with her enormous and complicated eyes. Now she lifts her pale forearms and thoroughly washes her face. Now she snaps her wings open, and floats away. I don't know exactly what a prayer is. I do know how to pay attention, how to fall down into the grass, how to kneel down in the grass, how to be idle and blessed, how to stroll through the fields, which is what I have been doing all d…